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Friday, November 8, 2019

Death in Nonmetro America

At CDC, Macarena C. Garcia and colleagues report on rural-metro differences in deaths from cancer, heart disease, unintentional injruy, chronic lower respiratory disease, and stroke
Nonmetropolitan counties had higher percentages of potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes than metropolitan counties during 2010–2017 nationwide, across public health regions, and in the majority of states. The gap between the most rural and most urban counties for potentially excess deaths increased during 2010–2017 for three causes of death (cancer, heart disease, and CLRD), decreased for unintentional injury, and remained relatively stable for stroke. Urban and suburban counties (large central metropolitan and large fringe metropolitan, medium metropolitan, and small metropolitan) experienced increases in potentially excess deaths from unintentional injury during 2010–2017, leading to a narrower gap between the already high (approximately 55%) percentage of excess deaths in noncore and micropolitan counties.
 Percentage of deaths that were potentially excess* among persons aged <80 2017="" by="" causes="" classification="" county="" death="" five="" from="" leading="" national="" of="" p="" states="" statistics="" system="" the="" united="" urban-rural="" vital="" years="">

This figure is a bar chart showing the percentage of deaths from the five leading causes of death in 2017 (cancer, heart disease, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease, and stroke) in large central metropolitan, large fringe metropolitan, medium metropolitan, small metropolitan, micropolitan, and noncore counties. In 2017, the percentages of deaths that were potentially excess from the five leading causes of death in noncore counties were 64.1% for unintentional injury, 57.1% for CLRD, 44.9% for heart disease, 21.7% for cancer, and 37.8% for stroke. The lowest percentage of potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes occurred in the most urban counties (large central metropolitan and large fringe metropolitan counties).